Change management is a systematic approach for managing the transition or transformation of an organisation’s goals, processes, or technologies. The purpose of change management is to implement strategies to carry out, control, and help people adapt to change. Change management models provide a framework for changing attitudes and behaviours alongside processes and equipment.

There are several models that help us think about change. Two popular models are:

  • Kotter’s 8 Step Model
  • The ADKAR Model

Kotter’s 8 Step Model

The 8 Step Model was created by John Kotter, a Change Management guru, professor, author, and founder of Kotter International, a management consulting firm based in Seattle and Boston. Kotter developed a model outlining eight crucial steps to be implemented sequentially to effectively manage change.

  • Create Urgency
    • Make a compelling case for the change.
    • Consider:
      • Who is the message coming from?
      • Are people on board?
      • Has everyone who needs to be informed been informed?
      • What is the reason for the change? Has the benefit been articulated?
  • Form a powerful coalition
    • Create a team of champions who will help drive the change
    • Consider:
      • Who in the organisation is likely to champion the change we are driving? How can we utilise their motivation?
      • Who is on board? Who isn’t?
      • What can our champions do to ensure the change is adopted by resisters?
  • Create a vision for change
    • Create a succinct, clear, and creative vision which has emotional appeal. Your staff should be able to relate to and be inspired by your vision.
    • Consider:
      • Is the vision relatable to all staff?
      • Do we have a clear vision?
  • Communicate the vision
    • Communicate the vision to staff in way that inspires them to champion the change.
    • Consider:
      • How will we communicate our vision?
  • Remove obstacles
    • Remove emotional and physical obstacles holding people back from adopting the change.
    • Consider:
      • Who is resisting? Why? How can we engage them? It can help to listen to staff concerns.
      • What practical barriers are impeding the change? What do we need to do to fix these?
  • Create short-term wins
        • Demonstrate tangible benefits of your change. Win over your staff by showing how the change is beneficial to them. Break down big wins into smaller, reachable wins.
        • Consider:
          • What benefits can we showcase?
          • Should wins be shared in a staged process?
          • How will we keep people informed about the progress of the change?
          • Will we continue to ask for feedback along the way?
          • How are wins being communicated?
  • Build on the change
    • Continue building upon and repeating the above steps.
          • Consider:
            • Are we being consistent in our message and demonstration of benefits?
            • Are we reinforcing the same clear message?
            • Do we have everyone on board or is there still resistance?
            • Are we articulating the benefits as they apply to each specific group of staff?
  • Anchor the change
    • Make sure the change sticks by embedding it into everyday practices, systems, and processes.
    • Consider:
      • Has the change been embedded in everyday work practices?
      • Have systems and processes been updated to accommodate the changes?
      • Is there a plan for how to train staff on the use of the new features?
    •  

Watch this 4 minute YouTube video for a summary of Kotter’s 8 Step Model.

ADKAR Model

The ADKAR Model for change management was developed by Jeff Hiatt, founder of Prosci, a global team of self-described “change fanatics.” ADKAR is an acronym representing five outcomes organisations need to achieve to ensure effective and lasting change:

  • Awareness
  • Desire
  • Knowledge
  • Ability
  • Reinforcement

The ADKAR model is underpinned by two fundamental ideas:

  • It is an individual who changes, not an organisation.
  • Successful change occurs when individual change matches the stage of organisational change. In other words, you want your people moving at the same rate as you are rolling out the change.

The five outcomes of the ADKAR Model are summarised below.

  1. Awareness
  • Make sure your people are aware of the need for change, and the change that has been planned for them.
  • Consider:
    • Do people understand the need driving the change?
    • Has the need for change been communicated to people? How? Do people feel included in the decision?
    • Are people on board with the decision?
    • Have people understood the big picture and their place in it?
  1. Desire
    • Build desire for change. Ensure your people are aware of the direct and personal benefits of the change.
    • Consider:
      • Do people understand “what’s in it for me?”
      • Is there “buy in?” Have people accepted the benefits?
      • Are people supporting the decision for change?
      • Are they motivated for change?
  1. Knowledge
    • Ensure your people have the right knowledge to implement the change within their division, team, and their specific role.
    • Consider:
      • Do people know how to change?
      • Is everyone equipped to embrace the change?
      • Have team leaders been given the tools to roll out the change in their team?
      • Has relevant training been designed specifically for each role? Is it feasible to run training?
      • Are there any barriers to knowledge dissemination?
  1. Ability
    • Ensure your people can demonstrate the new skills and behaviours expected of them. They may require support to develop new abilities.
    • Consider:
      • Is it possible for people to ask for help when they are confused about an element of their participation in the change?
      • Is support available? Is it accessible? Do people know about it?
  1. Reinforcement
    • Maintain and reinforce the change by rewarding change-aligned behaviour and managing counter-change behaviours.
    • Consider:
      • How will uptake of the change be monitored?
      • How will good behaviour be reinforced?
      • How will counter-change behaviour be managed?
      • How will people be helped through the transitional phase?
      • How will it be clear when change has been successfully implemented?

Watch this 5 minute YouTube video for a summary of the ADKAR Model.

If you’re in the thick of change, or plan to implement it soon, a change management model will help you guide your people through a smooth transition. If you would like further assistance with your change, contact Shelley Rogers, Organisational Psychologist at info@iod.com.au.

Change management is a systematic approach for managing the transition or transformation of an organisation’s goals, processes, or technologies. The purpose of change management is to implement strategies to carry out, control, and help people adapt to change. Change management models provide a framework for changing attitudes and behaviours alongside processes and equipment.

There are several models that help us think about change. Two popular models are:

  • Kotter’s 8 Step Model
  • The ADKAR Model

Kotter’s 8 Step Model

The 8 Step Model was created by John Kotter, a Change Management guru, professor, author, and founder of Kotter International, a management consulting firm based in Seattle and Boston. Kotter developed a model outlining eight crucial steps to be implemented sequentially to effectively manage change.

  • Create Urgency
    • Make a compelling case for the change.
    • Consider:
      • Who is the message coming from?
      • Are people on board?
      • Has everyone who needs to be informed been informed?
      • What is the reason for the change? Has the benefit been articulated?
  • Form a powerful coalition
    • Create a team of champions who will help drive the change
    • Consider:
      • Who in the organisation is likely to champion the change we are driving? How can we utilise their motivation?
      • Who is on board? Who isn’t?
      • What can our champions do to ensure the change is adopted by resisters?
  • Create a vision for change
    • Create a succinct, clear, and creative vision which has emotional appeal. Your staff should be able to relate to and be inspired by your vision.
    • Consider:
      • Is the vision relatable to all staff?
      • Do we have a clear vision?
  • Communicate the vision
    • Communicate the vision to staff in way that inspires them to champion the change.
    • Consider:
      • How will we communicate our vision?
  • Remove obstacles
    • Remove emotional and physical obstacles holding people back from adopting the change.
    • Consider:
      • Who is resisting? Why? How can we engage them? It can help to listen to staff concerns.
      • What practical barriers are impeding the change? What do we need to do to fix these?
  • Create short-term wins
      • Demonstrate tangible benefits of your change. Win over your staff by showing how the change is beneficial to them. Break down big wins into smaller, reachable wins.
      • Consider:
        • What benefits can we showcase?
        • Should wins be shared in a staged process?
        • How will we keep people informed about the progress of the change?
        • Will we continue to ask for feedback along the way?
        • How are wins being communicated?
  • Build on the change
    • Continue building upon and repeating the above steps.
        • Consider:
          • Are we being consistent in our message and demonstration of benefits?
          • Are we reinforcing the same clear message?
          • Do we have everyone on board or is there still resistance?
          • Are we articulating the benefits as they apply to each specific group of staff?
  • Anchor the change
    • Make sure the change sticks by embedding it into everyday practices, systems, and processes.
    • Consider:
      • Has the change been embedded in everyday work practices?
      • Have systems and processes been updated to accommodate the changes?
      • Is there a plan for how to train staff on the use of the new features?
  •  

Watch this 4 minute YouTube video for a summary of Kotter’s 8 Step Model.

ADKAR Model

The ADKAR Model for change management was developed by Jeff Hiatt, founder of Prosci, a global team of self-described “change fanatics.” ADKAR is an acronym representing five outcomes organisations need to achieve to ensure effective and lasting change:

  • Awareness
  • Desire
  • Knowledge
  • Ability
  • Reinforcement

The ADKAR model is underpinned by two fundamental ideas:

  • It is an individual who changes, not an organisation.
  • Successful change occurs when individual change matches the stage of organisational change. In other words, you want your people moving at the same rate as you are rolling out the change.

The five outcomes of the ADKAR Model are summarised below.

  1. Awareness
  • Make sure your people are aware of the need for change, and the change that has been planned for them.
  • Consider:
    • Do people understand the need driving the change?
    • Has the need for change been communicated to people? How? Do people feel included in the decision?
    • Are people on board with the decision?
    • Have people understood the big picture and their place in it?
  1. Desire
    • Build desire for change. Ensure your people are aware of the direct and personal benefits of the change.
    • Consider:
      • Do people understand “what’s in it for me?”
      • Is there “buy in?” Have people accepted the benefits?
      • Are people supporting the decision for change?
      • Are they motivated for change?
  2. Knowledge
    • Ensure your people have the right knowledge to implement the change within their division, team, and their specific role.
    • Consider:
      • Do people know how to change?
      • Is everyone equipped to embrace the change?
      • Have team leaders been given the tools to roll out the change in their team?
      • Has relevant training been designed specifically for each role? Is it feasible to run training?
      • Are there any barriers to knowledge dissemination?
  3. Ability
    • Ensure your people can demonstrate the new skills and behaviours expected of them. They may require support to develop new abilities.
    • Consider:
      • Is it possible for people to ask for help when they are confused about an element of their participation in the change?
      • Is support available? Is it accessible? Do people know about it?
  4. Reinforcement
    • Maintain and reinforce the change by rewarding change-aligned behaviour and managing counter-change behaviours.
    • Consider:
      • How will uptake of the change be monitored?
      • How will good behaviour be reinforced?
      • How will counter-change behaviour be managed?
      • How will people be helped through the transitional phase?
      • How will it be clear when change has been successfully implemented?

Watch this 5 minute YouTube video for a summary of the ADKAR Model.

If you’re in the thick of change, or plan to implement it soon, a change management model will help you guide your people through a smooth transition. If you would like further assistance with your change, contact Shelley Rogers, Organisational Psychologist at info@iod.com.au.

Anxiety is a commonly experience mental health condition.  14.4% of Australians aged 16 to 85 have experienced an anxiety disorder in the last 12 months.4 This is equivalent to 2.71 million people today.  And 32.0% of females aged 16 to 85 will experience an anxiety disorder in their lifetime compared to 20.4% of men.

Source: https://www.beyondblue.org.au/media/statistics

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